Surimono prints were privately commissioned for special occasions, such as New Year, and were produced in smaller numbers for a mostly educated audience. In most cases, they were commissioned by poetry societies to illustrate the winning poem in a poetry contest judged by the master of the society. Kabuki actors also commissioned surimono prints to commemorate important events in their careers, such as changes of name and stage debuts of their sons. They were most popular from the 1790s to the 1830s. More at Wikipedia.

Shikishiban format
Nagaban format
Miscellaneous formats


Format: Shikishiban

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Writing Table with Silver Rabbit paperweight
Date: 1819
FAMSF
X
Courtesan and Kamuro at New Year
正月の遊女と禿
Date: 1820
Boston MFA
X
Collection of seals in lacquer trays
Date: ~1820
Chicago
x
Actor Ichikawa Danjûrô VII at New Year
Date: 1820
Rijksmuseum
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Votive plaque of the actor Bando Mitsugoro III as Sasaki Takatsuna
Date: 1821
Chicago / Rijksmuseum
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The actors Ichikawa Danjuro VII as Kajiwara Genta Kagesue and Ichikawa Monnosuke III as Umegae
Date: 1821
Chicago
X
The Crane Dance
(Hinazuru no mai)
雛鶴の舞
Date: 1821 (Bunsei 4)
Boston MFA
x
Goddess Benten playing sugoroku with a child
Poetry by Fûgetsuan Yûshun and Wainandô
Date: Probably 1821
Fitzwilliam
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Pocket watch
Date: ~1823
Chicago / MET
x
Ichikawa Danjūrō VII in the role of Shibaraku
Date: 1824
Rijksmuseum
x
Monkey and Turtle
Date: 1824
Rijksmuseum
x
Poetry Cards from the One Hundred Poems by One Hundred Poets
歌カルタ
Date: 1833 (Tenpô 4)
LACMA / Boston MFA
x
Umeomaru from the 'Kanegaki Soga'
British Museum

Format: Nagaban

X
Descending Geese
Date: 1825-35
Chicago

Format: Miscellaneous

X
Monkey trainer
Date: 1848
MIA